Indecent Images

Protection of Children Act 1978 & Criminal Justice Act 2003

indecent images of childrenAlmost every memo, spreadsheet and document is created on a computer. Whether it is a PC, Mac or Linux operating system, the computer forensics investigator must be able to identify, seize, collect and preserve electronic evidence in indecent images of children (IIoC) cases.

‘Child pornography’ – or possession/distribution of indecent images of children – perhaps the most emotive of criminal offences. ‘Association of Chief Police Officers’ (ACPO) statistics suggest that 84% of the overall case load for High Tech Crime Units (HTCU) across the UK involves indecent imagery and child abuse investigations. This area of crime is often seen as the ‘dark side of the web’ and as a result is perhaps the least discussed.

Tracing the digital footprint in indecent images of children (IIoC) investigations starts upon the seizure of potential digital evidence. As electronic media is very sensitive, assessments must be undertaken swiftly to avoid corruption or loss of crucial evidentiary material. Computer forensics is the discipline of identifying, extracting and preserving digital evidence found in a wide assortment of digital media – from computer hard disks to the memory contents of a mobile phone.

identify the source of images and searches performed
From the 40GB home computer to the 2TB Raid 5 UNIX server, computer forensic examinations for indecent images must be conducted in a systematic and consistent manner. These techniques involve fragile data that can easily be hidden, wiped, disguised, cloaked, encrypted or even destroyed from storage media. This work can only be handled by experienced and qualified professionals; the results of the analysis have to withstand the scrutiny of a courtroom.

We offer a 24×7 comprehensive computer forensics investigation service for indecent images of children (IIoC) cases that involves the recovery of digital information. Our experts work with clients to determine the nature of incidents and use established computer forensic investigation techniques to preserve evidence, whilst maintaining its continuity and integrity.

expert reports for courts to assist in evidence contextOur service includes the post-analysis review of computer forensics and indecent images investigation results and the preparation of a detailed investigation report. If criminal or other legal proceedings are necessary we can produce witness statements and attend court to deliver expert testimony in support of the analysis undertaken and material found.

Indecent Images

Relevant acts in this field of crime are the Protection of Children Act 1999, Criminal Justice Act 2003, Sexual Offences Act 2003 and the newly released Coroners and Justice Act 2009. Specialist establishments also exist with the aims of preventing and managing the threat, including the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) and the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP).

The ‘Combating Paedophile Information Networks in Europe’ (COPINE) project originally created a ten point scale to grade the severity of indecent images. In the case of R v OLIVER (2003), the Sentencing Advisory Panel (SAP) modified the COPINE typology and adopted a 1 – 5 grading system:

  • Grade 1: Images depicting nudity or erotic posing, with no sexual activity
    • Grade 2: Sexual activity between children, or solo masturbation by a child
      • Grade 3: Non-penetrative sexual activity between adult(s) and child(ren)
        • Grade 4: Penetrative sexual activity between child(ren) and adult(s)
          • Grade 5: Sadism or bestiality

          All our indecent images of children (IIoC) investigations are conducted within a physically and electronically secure environment and when undertaken at client premises we strive to conduct our work with minimal disruption to your business. Our systematic approach to investigations can significantly reduce the cost and time of an internal investigation (and of any court-ordered disclosure).

          Our forensic specialists are completely independent and accept instructions on behalf of both the Crown Prosecution Service, Defence Solicitors and corporations.

Login

Lost your password?